3 Big Reasons Why Do You Write

Why Do You Write Featured Image

I write because I have something to say. Through words, I can make my emotions tangible.

Where did it all start? 

When did you start writing?

Why do you write? 

Do you write because you want to make money?

Or, do you write because you know your words have the power to change someone’s life?

Honestly, there’s not that much to say when it comes to specifying the reasons for writing because it only boils down to two things:

  1. Income
  2. Creative self-expression 

You see, many people want to write because they know it’s a big component in running a blog, though they know writing isn’t their best asset. 

Especially nowadays, blogging becomes the easiest, yet, the most powerful platform one could build—to build a 6- or even 7-figure business. 

That said, many people continuously build one blog to the other for business experimentation. Trying to leverage their businesses to a massive audience globally.

True, blogging helps a lot to achieve this goal.

Many people want to write because they know it’s a big component in running a blog, though they know writing isn’t their best asset. In other words, they write for money. That’s all.

So, others, who don’t have a blog, only saw this spectrum of blogging. They think people blog because it’s the best way to become self-employed. 

Blinded with tons of success stories, they jump into this industry without knowing what’s coming ahead of them. 

Little did they know, a blog will not be as successful as one desires if there’s no soul in their content. When someone publishes a piece of content that doesn’t speak people’s hearts, everything crumbles. Nothing will work.

That’s also the reason for a blogger’s inability to capture leads, conversions, in general, the site’s overall performance. Your traffic will remain low. You barely generate results from your hard work.

If you take a look at several Facebook groups, you see people, a lot of people, desperate to increase their following or their web traffic. 

What they didn’t realize is that their audience will only likely stick with them if they feel connected or heard from the content they’re reading. Another reason is the ability of the writer to give them what they want. 

In other words, it all boils down to the writer’s “why”. 

Why do you want to write? 

If you are planning to write a new blog post, why do you want that written? What kinds of answers are you seeking from that content?

These questions bring us to the three big reasons that push you to start writing. 

3 Big Reasons Why Do You Write

Writing is subjective. There are no right or wrong reasons for doing it. It may not be an obvious tool but it can either contribute for the better or for worse, depending on the intent of the writer. 

It doesn’t exclude blogs, though. The success of the blog lies in the intent of the writer who produces content to make it run. 

So, what are your big reasons for writing?

  • Do you write for self-expression?
  • Do you write to find your purpose?
  • Do you write to establish your writer brand? 

1. You write for self-expression.

I write because I have something to say. It is through words I can make my emotions tangible. It is only through words I can feel peace by transforming the silent chaos I feel with me into something others could learn. 

Partly because I’m an introvert, writing is the best way for me to prevent losing my sanity. I’m not comfortable sharing myself with others and I simply couldn’t speak out loud what others want to hear from me. 

Being expressive takes a lot of energy on my part. And if I consistently do that, it would take a toll on me and my health.

Because of that, I prefer writing my feelings to speed up the processing and letting go of that emotional baggage.

Therefore, the first reason for people to write is for self-expression. It doesn’t matter if one writes a fiction, non-fiction, blog post, or whatever content as long as it gives them the results they want. The writer’s pleasure, if you will.

It’s because writing allows you to be who you are without judgment. You immerse yourself with the character’s life. 

You enjoy the melody of the words you write than say. You find your sense of purpose by helping others even without a spoken word. 

2. You write to find your purpose. 

Have you noticed a lot more people become interested in personal development? 

If you look closely at online publishing platforms like Medium, the posts that tackle topics related to self tend to perform better. 

On YouTube alone, there’s a countless number of channels talking about the same thing. So, what gives? 

Now that the ongoing pandemic greatly affected us economically, spiritually, physically, emotionally, holistically, the global reset pushes us to take a big pause and take the time to find our sense of purpose. 

Writing, specifically journal writing or freewriting, allows you to jot down stuff from your head, pouring all your emotions onto the pen as you scribble the words you want to say but you can’t in real life. 

Writing allows you to be yourself. Be it online or offline. Be it a diary or a blog. 

However, this isn’t effective if you aren’t willing to become open and to share yourself with the rest of us. If this is true to you, no wonder why you can’t connect with your audience. 

3. You write to establish your writing brand. 

This is where blogging comes into the picture. In fact, it’s the most popular one—the one that brings money. 

If not through blogging, it could be an online platform where you actively update your works i.e. Wattpad or content mill providers (Upwork or OnlineJobs.ph). 

Though it could be your best alternative to get away from your 9 to 5, you have to be very careful with this one. 

Many writers tend to question their “why” when they start blogging. Why is this happening? 

It’s because blogging requires writers to become content marketers, SEO experts, or social media strategists. These are a few of the reasons for writers to get lost in between. 

Running a blog is a one-man show. When you begin your journey as a blogger, you juggle with many tasks to ensure it runs smoothly.

That said, it’s common for writers to confuse their motivation to write with the tangible results it brings. 

Running a blog is a one-man show. You don’t have anybody with you to help you out. Oftentimes, you find yourself juggling with many tasks required for blogging. Writing, content marketing, social media marketing, etc. These, however, contribute to writer’s confusion if they are blogger or writer.

I remember I started this blog to become an outlet for my writer brand, as an author to be exact. I enjoyed reaping the benefits—affiliate commissions, income from freelancing gigs.

But it’s only at the tip of the iceberg.

What’s underneath the surface is me, gasping for breath, trying to swim harder to live. 

Whenever I write one post to the other, I feel this hollow feeling that rivaled the deepest and the biggest whirlwinds of the Pacific as I began to lose the spark. The spark that drove me to try blogging one last time. 

The income from freelance writing blinded me with my purpose of doing this. Certainly, it brought temporary joy for me and my family as it helped us financially. 

However, I just woke up, staring at the ceiling, wondering if this is all worth it. Financially, yes. My writing job allowed me to enjoy a lot of opportunities that only writers can do. 

But it slowly destroyed me. 

When money becomes your sole motivation to write, it’s like building a castle on the sand. It’s not a stable option as you slowly question your purpose as a writer. 

You start to ask yourself if this content only brings joy to the site owners who benefited a lot from your writing such as, good traffic.

You begin to ask big, unanswerable questions about your legacy as a writer. 

Conclusion – So, Why Do You Want To Write? 

Are you writing solely for financial stability? 

Are you writing to find the answers to your existence? 

Or, are you writing for both? 

Regardless of your reasons, the important thing is to embody the writer’s spirit within you as you write. 

You have to have a definite reason behind the post, for instance. If that’s crystal clear, you wouldn’t have problems writing the next project. Be it your next blog post or your next book. 

Because you know what, no matter how much you tweak your content for the sake of the search engine, it would be useless if your audience doesn’t get anything beneficial from it. 

Therefore, every writer should focus on how their literature helps others and makes an impact.

Because you know what, no matter how much you tweak your content for the sake of the search engine, it would be useless if your audience doesn’t get anything beneficial from it. 

The content will only perform at its best when its message is clear and resonates well with the audience it targets. 

Am I making sense to you? 

If yes, it’s your turn to answer my question. 

What’s your reason for writing?

If you plan to launch a blog to leverage your writer brand, why do you want to do it? 

What’s your motive for getting into so much stress in running a website for that matter? 

Share your answers in the comment section below. 

Do you like this post? Feel free to share it with your friends and family. 

If you have anything to add in this post, feel free to share them in the comment section below as well. 🙂

Do you want to start a blog to leverage your writer brand? Sign up here and claim my generous bonuses just for you! 

By M Gaspary

She dedicates herself to teaching you how to become an irresistible writer. Discover the secrets here. Get access to her EXCLUSIVE library and download your FREE copies of her eBooks here.

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