5 Things You Forgot As A Writer – Hibiki Japanese Movie Review

If you’re writing a book because you love fame and money, just stop. You write because you want to say something others can’t. Be the voice of the mouths silenced by means of words you say in every page you wrote.

Something caught my eye today and I intend to watch the movie Hibiki, a Japanese movie released in 2018. It’s a 1-hour live action movie of a Japanese seinen series “Hibiki: Shōsetsuka ni Naru Hōhō” published in 2018 under Big Cosmic Superior.

5 Things You Forgot As A Writer - Hibiki Japanese Movie Review
Photo credits to owner

It’s about a 15-year-old girl, Hibiki Akui, and her unusual story in her work “Fairytale Garden” resulting in garnering so much attention on media. A masterpiece that earned 2 awards only a few ones can achieve.

Yet, what struck me the most is how she reacted and faced all the troubles with nonchalance. She believed in her writing and she did her best amid the tough competition against those who are older and more seasoned than her. To her, writing and reading a novel is worth her life.

What Hibiki is all about?

Hibiki is about the main character’s life as a genius novelist at the young age of 15. She came from a family without connections from the publishing company or influence. What she has at hand is her faith and love for her works.

Through writing, she met Fumi Hanai, a young aspiring editor who wishes to publish masterpiece like Hibiki’s. After the colleague threw the manuscript, she picked it up out of curiosity and immediately she became obsessed with.

The thing is the author didn’t disclose any contact information. Hence, she’s desperate to meet her and have her work published under her supervision.

Through Mr. Suboe’s daughter, she met Hibiki in person. That’s when she learned the intense passion from a novelist she never saw before as Hibiki doesn’t care about people’s reactions to her work. Rather, she cares about the work itself. Not only for her own, but for other authors as well.

She confronted a countless number of novelist and received a number of assaults from her not because she wants revenge or something related but she wanted to express how she’s disappointed with the lame work published. She hates it when authors write something out of a personal motive to fame and money.

Her violent behavior became the focus of everyone. For whatever reason, it attracted so much attention to her work albeit the troubles she’s in, including her rivals. “Don’t judge a book without even reading it,” she said many times.

What Are The 5 Things You Forgot As A Writer?

After watching the whole movie, I thought of 3 main highlights that resonated me the most.

As a novelist, I admit there are times I caught myself in a situation wherein I feel guilty because I couldn’t write. However, watching Hibiki drove me to do what I have to, continue writing my unfinished story.

1. Know why you want to write.

The story centered on how she outshines every writer. As a matter of fact, she reminded me of why I started writing stories. She took me to the time when I simply wondered if there’s a place for someone like me in a publishing industry.

2. Writer’s block relates perfectionism.

Although I’m still working for it now, I finished 3 works so far and continued to write more. Yet, there are times when burnout prevented me from finishing them leading to what we call “Writer’s block.” It’s a common consequence of perfection.

Being a perfectionist, I doubt I could finish anything. I have second thoughts all the time whether my current work ends nicely as I imagined it to be. As for my previous works, my husband has been reading it and he tells me to revise and all that stuff.

3. Keep writing no matter what people say.

“Just read. I leave all the dirty work to the editor,” I repeatedly said to him in response. True. I let everyone see my work and judge. But they don’t have the right to change it because they want it. Not even my husband can outdo my judgment.

It’s my work. It’s my prerogative if I want to change it or not. If I do, it’s not because it’s popular or pleases someone, but it’s something that makes my heart flutter.

4. Violence can be an option.

There are many times when you can’t help but punch someone’s face because they keep belittling your hard work. I would if that happens to me. “You don’t have the right to judge my book unless if you are my editor. You’re not,” I told my husband after he kept telling BS.

I love him. But my personality changes if the conversation is about my work. I don’t want to ridicule my work just because. I want them to have concrete reasons behind their judgment. Not even he can stop that.

5. Have faith in your work.

Don’t write if you don’t have faith in your work in the end. For three months of hard work, do you think it’s fair to doubt it? I don’t think so. For years I spent writing my works, I am aware I couldn’t please everyone. But even though it’s like that, I still keep doing it.

I know my stories makes someone happy. So, there’s no way I would belittle it because I didn’t please everyone’s taste. I don’t care.

You wrote the story after you got an inspiration. You started writing it every single day for the whole 1 to 3 months and then, here you are throwing it because you think nobody’s going to care? Think about it.

Conclusion

Hibiki is a great Japanese movie and I’m very happy to have watched it today. Especially if you are writing stories and doubting if it’s going to work or not. Certainly, there are times when you have second thoughts whether that story would inspire someone or at least leave a memory in their heads.

It’s up to them. It’s their problem. Not yours.

The thing is, as a novelist, you have to take care of what you’re writing and why. You have to know exactly why you want to do this and go through the hellish world of publishing. Make sure that every time you finish a story and have it published, you love every word you wrote.

Don’t write a story to share lame, worthless trash. Share a story that touches people’s hearts, reminding them of the itty-bitty things forgotten today. That’s your job as a novelist. You write stories. Be sure you write what’s inside your heart.

Not to please anyone.

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